Category Archives: Uncategorized

It’s time 2 build the kids-led biodiversity bonds par

This is where I will start to put together, thoughts, partners, and the evolving framework of the kids-led riparian justice biodiversity bond. We are basing it on the real world example of biodiversity as the path to justice for indigenous people in Borneo that is told in the movie Rise of the Ecowarriors, with longtime partner in crime Mark White and Cynthia LaGrou of Compathos a film making and distributing foundation. We have parts of the team. We want to build use place-sourcing and pattern recognition to build regenerative communities within a network where peer learning and emergent adaptation thrives.

This bond is part of the  Neighborhood Economics project, which has been given skunk works R&D funding for the past nine months by Good Capital, where I, Kevin Jones, lead portfolio company engagement. We will be talking about the progress toward the bond at SOCAP15, the largest social enterprise meets impact investor, meets development agency, meets foundations conference in the world, the place where people discover unlikely allies as they meet surprising but valuable strangers.

Riding a food fad to an opportunity

A recent article on investigating if rising consumer demand for chia seeds can help farmers in developing countries.  It would be an ironic return for an ancient crop. Chia originated in Mexico and Guatemala some 3,500 years ago, when the seeds were a staple food of the Mayans and Aztecs. The Spanish conquistadors, in attempting to squash the local culture, banned the indigenous peoples from eating it.

Last part of the 1st round of interviews: Deals and Companies

Good Capital, the previous fund, has invested among others in fair trade companies. What can be learnt from the experience so far? Kevin tells us: 

Next, Kevin presents another example of the kind of deals that the fund wants to make in the future.

So, how do these people actually find those potential companies to invest in and based on what criteria? Shaun gives us an answer:

Interview series takes a look at resilience

This post is a follow up to the first highlights from the interviews introduced last week. Before deals and companies next week, let’s take a look at resilience, especially of socio-ecological systems.

Resilience is one of the key constructs that the fund draws on. The Stockholm Resilience Center, one of our partners, offers deep experience measuring holistic impact and their 9 planetary boundaries for resilience inform our selection of investment opportunities and risk analysis.

Kevin tells us how he sees resilience: 

Shaun’s view on resilience and it’s usefulness as a framework: 

Thank you for reading and watching, and don’t forget to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.  If you have any comments or questions, please leave them below or contact bioculturalresilience@gmail.com.

Happy New Year 2014!

Rockefeller puts energy behind resilience blog

The Rockefeller Foundation, which is funding chief resilience officers in 33 cities, 11 in the U.S., six of which have Impact Hubs, is making its blog a good source of news and commentary about resilience.

Link

Climate Risk Reduction Index

Climate Risk Reduction Index

Managing climate risk is increasingly taking on many forms.  This UN backed initiative is undertaking regional, national and sub-national assessments where action can make a difference. They have begun with Central America followed with West Africa.  While oriented toward informing governments and aid agencies, it is also relevant at a local and enterprise level that can also consider what they identify as the most important risk drivers.

  • Risk Driver 1: Environment and natural resources.
  • Risk Driver 2: Socioeconomic conditions.
  • Risk Driver 3: Land use and the built environment.
  • Risk Driver 4: Governance.

This related Climate Vulnerability Monitor is a real eye opener offering a ‘guide to the cold calculus of a hot planet.’

Investing in ancestral superfoods: sustainable solution or passing fad?

I just gave a very well received presentation at Tufts University on ancestral superfoods. Densely nutritious foods like chia used by indigenous people for centuries worldwide are being discovered in a new way in response to consumers growing demand for naturally healthy food in developed and emerging markets. With demand exceeding supply for a variety of products, opportunities are abound to invest in expanding sustainably grown food that affirms traditional ecological knowledge, can be good to local people and the environment while bringing highly nutritious food to market.